Foodbridge Blog Bridges Cultures Through Cooking

There’s really no better way to get to know someone than by sitting down and sharing a meal. Sarah Melamed, plant biologist and naturalist, aims to make those connections happen by recreating recipes from all over the Middle East and the Mediterranean on her eclectic blog, Foodbridge.

In multicultural Israel, where Melamed lives, every kitchen offers tempting regional dishes. But most of us don’t follow our noses to find out more. What we like about Foodbridge is that when the author tastes something she likes, she tracks the recipe down, collecting the food traditions of the people who cook it along the way.

On Foodbridge, even a standard Western granola recipe is more than just oats and nuts.  To fill the picture out, she discusses the Jewish holiday Tu B’Shvat, where traditionally families feast on local fruit and nuts, and shows us vivid photos of  local almond trees.

A quest to find the best – the very best – choumous in Israel – takes the reader through picturesque Old Jaffa and Ramla, with a humorous glimpse of the local workforce. And apart from armchair travel, let us just mention how mouthwatering her Kurdish dishes are. We’ve made her Kurdish meatballs with Swiss Chard twice since she published the recipe.

If you like food, feel curious about the cooking of the Middle East, and enjoy following food adventures, you’ll like Foodbridge.

Read more about regional food of the Middle East:

::Foodbridge

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14 thoughts on “Foodbridge Blog Bridges Cultures Through Cooking”

  1. Yael says:

    Sarah Melamed rocks.

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