Jerusalem’s Green-Roofed Gutman Center is a Home for the Birds and the Bees

green architecture, urban development, sustainable development, green building, Jerusalem, SPNI,The Society for the Protection of Nature in Israel commissioned a very green addition to the Jerusalem Bird Observatory, and let’s just say the birds and the bees are making themselves at home!

Many buildings tend to create hazardous environments for fauna and flora, or else wipe them out altogether, but the Gutman Visitor Center at the Jersulem Bird Observatory is designed to do the exact opposite. Not only does the building designed by Weinstein Vaadia Architects have a turf roof covered in wildflowers and weeds that invites insects and crawlers to go wild, but the walls have been designed specifically to encourage all kinds of birds to nest in them! Step in to learn more about this super green design and to see a few more images of this inspiring project finished last year!

green architecture, urban development, sustainable development, green building, Jerusalem, SPNI,

Commissioned by the Society for the Protection of Nature in Israel (SPNI), the Jerusalem Bird Observatory is an extraordinary example of ecologically-friendly urban design. The project was developed within an existing wall and shed, ensuring a minimum of new materials used, and features a variety of nature-friendly design principles.

Green roofs are good for keeping a building well-insulated and for creating something of a carbon sponge. But they can also be used to filter rainwater runoff and promote biodiversity. Although they are not easy to see, the Gutman VC also has living walls, which add even more green goodness to the building.

green architecture, urban development, sustainable development, green building, Jerusalem, SPNI,

But perhaps the most inspiring aspect of this project are the walls that have been specially-designed to promote a habitat for birds, albeit not so surprising given that this is the Bird Observatory! All of the stone and plastic-clad walls have wood-lined cavities that are perfect for different sized birds to nest in. It’s also a cozy spot for bees, bats, lizards, and other critters.

Finally, Weinstein has installed a greywater recycling system to ensure that all of these great green spaces can be irrigated without tapping into the region’s already scarce clean resources.

:: Arch Daily

all images © Amir Balaban

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Syria’s Beehive Shaped Architecture
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