Develop self-healing therapy skills at home this summer, with the environment in mind

acid rain forests bounce back, sweet woman in the forest

Forest bathing is a kind of therapy called for in some cultures like Japan.

When I was a kid in suburbia having a therapist meant you had real problems — problems like depression that could not be solved through gardening, a 30-minute job, or date night. A therapist 30 years ago in suburbia meant you were destined to suffer emotional trauma and anxiety for many years and be lucky if you ever came out of it. 

As I grew up and the world lost its stigmas to therapy more and more of my friends took on therapists –- or become one themselves. Especially in cities where life can be full of stress.

Times have changed and having a therapist can be a source of pride if you have found a good one. My friends in New York and Tel Aviv brag over who has the best one. But how can you combine therapy to your passion and interests like ecology or sustainability? I mean, can you find someone who supports your basic values while helping you grow into yourself? 

forest bathing, woman hipster contemplating nature in dark green forest

In a way dealing with yourself and therapy has never been easier. Now that most of us have recovered from Covid anxiety and are mainly learning to live with the risks, like driving, there are plenty of resources you can find online while starting that Victory Garden

One site can help you find the person that fits your style and state of mind is https://www.betterhelp.com/start/. You can explore the option of online therapy on BetterHelp’s website.

If you live in a small town, chances are it will be harder and you might even need to work with a therapist that has known you since high-school. Imagine the dread? But online, your choices become much wider.

Some therapists working in the ecosphere might suggest you forest bathe, rent an AirBnB in the country and get out in fresh air. Others might suggest you work with your hands doing crafts or baking. Sewing, woodworking, pottery are all great. 

A lot has been lost since we urbanized and moved our work online. Sore bodies, sore minds and souls some research shows can really be solved by getting out and about. Some of these activities you can do at home if you are still isolating with Covid. 

Zoom sessions might help you forget yourself and learn some new skills or  attend a friend’s wedding halfway around the world, but a good person to person heart to heart is invaluable if you want to invest in yourself as well as your garden this summer. 

Small guide to self-healing at home

Get a pet. When you need to take care of someone you tend to see your life is more important or useful. If you don’t have a child, find a way to make a furry friend be part of your home. It’s always better to visit shelters before buying a dog or cat that’s been bred. Google a location to find an SPCA or shelter near you.

Start a garden, maybe even just a herb garden in your window. A big summer garden might be too ambitious now that it’s the end of August but buying some pots or making pots in pottery class can be perfect for starting a window or patio herb garden. Getting dirt under your fingernails might even be good for you according to studies we have read that suggest good bacteria can invigorate your immune system.

Start dancing. You don’t need a partner, just a small room and a speaker. 

Numerous studies have pointed to Vitamin D being essential to brace yourself against Covid. The best solution: play with your pet and get that garden going in the late afternoon sun. We’ve heard 20 minutes is a good amount of exposure.

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