Blueseed’s Incredible Offshore Visa-Free Hub for Foreign Innovators in California

Blueseed, Cleantech, renewable energy, waste water treatment, alternative energy, visa-free hub, googolplex of the sea, California

California-based startup company Blueseed has plans to either build or retrofit a ship that will provide accommodation and office space for talented foreign innovators who don’t meet America’s stringent working visa regulations. Since the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City, even the brightest would-be entrepreneurs have met serious legislative barriers to getting their companies off the ground in Silicon Valley.

Blueseed’s CEO Max Marty and his team aims to change all that by giving 1,000 of the best entrepreneurs a chance to develop their ideas “in an ecosystem designed for their success” in the contiguous zone just 12 nautical miles from San Francisco. Although still in the planning stage, Paypal’s founder Peter Thiel has already entered the 500K USD “seed funding” round of the project, which will also showcase cutting edge waste management and energy generating technologies. 

Blueseed, Cleantech, renewable energy, waste water treatment, alternative energy, visa-free hub, googolplex of the sea, California

Wasted talent

So much foreign talent is wasted as a result of the United States’ immigration laws, which turns out to be an impediment to growth in America. Blueseed’s innovation hub will reverse that trend by allowing visionary techies with a passport to live and work on the adapted ship.

Albeit just a short ferry ride from San Francisco, the hub’s residents will have access to the internet, as well as entertainment, fitness, and medical facilities on board. They will also be able to purchase food around the clock.

Blueseed, Cleantech, renewable energy, waste water treatment, alternative energy, visa-free hub, googolplex of the sea, California

Blueseed’s green vision

Making their offshore venture “green” is a priority and Blueseed is eager to incorporate new green technologies into the ship’s design. Marty explained in an email interview that technology has evolved to such an extent that it is possible to make waste water almost fit for human consumption, and that a host of renewable energy opportunities now exist.

However, Marty is concerned to find applications that are both environmentally sensible and financially viable, and hopes to connect with individuals or organizations that can pose solutions to these challenges.

Blueseed, Cleantech, renewable energy, waste water treatment, alternative energy, visa-free hub, googolplex of the sea, California

Opportunities for clean tech firms

Although it is not impossible for startups to succeed in the Middle East, this could be an excellent opportunity for innovators in the region to spread their wings and enjoy the support of a well-established network of go-getters.

If you are serious about helping Blueseed turn their offshore visa-free facility into a lean, green machine and advancing your own clean tech savvy in the process, contact Max Marty at max [at] blueseed [dot] co.

Tafline Laylin adapted this story from an interview she conducted with Blueseed’s Max Marty and Dan Dascalescu for her work at Inhabitat.

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4 thoughts on “Blueseed’s Incredible Offshore Visa-Free Hub for Foreign Innovators in California”

  1. There was an abortion ship working off the coast of Spain or Portugal for similar reasons – abortion is not illegal in international waters. Radio for Peace off the coast of Israel years ago, also worked on this principle.

  2. Imagine the kinds of meetings that can take place there? Arguably, if it were to attract the world’s greatest minds we’d have to ask why the Feds would deny participants a VISA?

  3. They have to be close to American soil because they need to be able to ferry back and forth to Silicon Valley. The idea is that such proximity will be a boon for their projects, and money will go back into the American economy.

  4. Is being close to US soil so important? Why don’t they just buy an island somewhere in South America or move where there are less restrictions and closer to the native countries of their employees?

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