Noradrenaline and how we sleep deep

Having a hard time sleeping during Covid? Or maybe you are sleeping better because you have less stressors from the commute? Or maybe you are self-medicating with CBD? During good, deep sleep, we rarely respond to external stimuli such as sounds, unless they are strong enough, like an alarm clock, or meaningful, like a baby’s […]

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David Attenborough’s PBS climate special features Greta, not Gore

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On Earth Day, April 22, PBS (America’s Public Broadcasting Service) will premiere a compelling new documentary, Climate Change – The Facts, presenting scientific evidence of the impact of global warming. The program also examines possible solutions to the crisis, including the latest innovations, technology and actions individuals can take to prevent further damage. The one-hour […]

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How microbes find an oil spill

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When containing a massive disaster like an oil spill, small microbes play a big role. Arezoo Ardekani, a Purdue University associate professor of mechanical engineering, has published research that describes the complex hydrodynamics of microorganisms at liquid-liquid and gas-liquid interfaces, showing that microbes may flock to areas where surfactant has been applied. This is important […]

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Two’s company, three is a crowd: solving a Newtonian pickle

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When two (or three bodies of different sizes and distances) orbit a center point, it’s easy to calculate their movements using Newton's laws of motion. However, if all three objects are of a comparable size and distance from the center point, a power struggle develops and the whole system is thrown into chaos. When chaos happens, it becomes impossible to track the bodies’ movements using regular math. Enter the three-body problem. Now, an international team, led by astrophysicist Dr. Nicholas Stone at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Racah Institute of Physics, has taken a big step forward in solving this conundrum. Their findings were published in the latest edition of Nature.

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A new periodic table for Quantum Physics

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In the past twenty years, both scientists’ understanding of the physical properties of quantum dots and their levels of control over these tiny particles have increased tremendously.  This has led to a widespread application of quantum dots in our daily lives—from bio-imaging and bio-tracking (relying on the fact that quantum dots emit different colors based on their size) to solar energy and next-generation TV monitors with exceptional color quality.

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Researching the deep of the sea with “Deep Heart” station

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A first-of-its-kind deep-sea research station placed 50km (31mi) from the Israeli shore called DeepLev which combines “deep” with the Israeli meaning for heart which is “lev”. Reaching a 1.5km depth (~1mi) it is set to shed new light on the eastern Mediterranean marine environment and the implications changes in this ecosystem hold for humans. The […]

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Why you should never flush your contact lenses

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New research presented by the American Chemical Society at their August meeting warned of the damage disposable contact lenses cause after they’re flushed down our home plumbing, a daily habit of many of the 45 million Americans who wear them. Those flimsy, flexible lenses easily pass through sewage treatment plant filters.  Sinking to the bottom of rivers and oceans, the impacts […]

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Change your DNA with a trip to outer space!

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American twins Scott (left) and Mark Kelly are the only identical twin astronauts in history, but after Scott spent nearly a year on a space mission, they may not be identical anymore. In 2016, when Scott Kelly returned to Earth after a 340-day voyage aboard the International Space Station (ISS), he was 2 inches taller […]

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