King Abdullah: Israel is Disrupting Jordan’s Nuclear Plans

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Does placing Israel in the same camp as the anti-nuclear movement in Jordan have negative implications for the success and popularity of the campaign? Since 2009, when Jordan first announced its nuclear ambitions, the country has been through a parliamentary review of nuclear power, accusations of slander by the head of the Jordanian Atomic Energy Commission and dozens of  protests […]

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Turkey Ripe For Renewable Energy Boom – So Why The Delay?

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Despite its vast solar and wind energy potential, Turkey’s renewable resources have only been developed in small pockets of the country, such as the windy Aegean island of Bozcaada (pictured above). With European countries having already tapped most of their low-hanging renewable energy development opportunities, Turkey is perfectly poised to become the new renewable energy […]

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Jordanian Activists Take To The Streets For A Sustainable Future

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Activists gathered on the streets of Amman today to say ‘No’ to nuclear energy and ‘Yes’ to renewables Following years of anti-nuclear campaigning and (more recent) controversy surrounding Jordan’s nuclear programme, Greenpeace activists in Jordan are stepping up their protests. They gathered today to launch a public dialogue about the dangers of nuclear energy and to […]

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Turkey’s Economic Growth Hampered By Oil Addiction, Analysts Say

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Rising international petroleum prices are bad news for Turkey, which imports 90 percent of the oil it consumes. Turkey’s dependence on imported oil has already been key in creating its $86.6 billion current account deficit, and will continue to hold the country back from reaching its full growth potential, according to analysts from three major […]

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Turkish Cabinet Invokes Wartime Law To Seize Property For Hydro Projects

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The more than 20 hydroelectric projects that Turkey has built on the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers have been sharply criticized for displacing populations and harming the local environment. Now it’s even easier for hydro companies to build destructive dams in Turkey. Real estate for 13 different hydroelectric projects in 12 provinces can now be seized […]

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Qatar Eco-Summit Spotlights Environmental Safety

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8th annual Health, Safety and Environment Forum in Energy happens in Doha from October 8 -10 Accidents associated with oil and gas operations endanger human life, damage adjacent communities and threaten the environment. The shockwaves of these accidents affect the business involved and its workers, and extend far beyond.  Millions of dollars are spent annually […]

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Plans For Turkey’s First Nuclear Power Plant Revealed

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Located in the southern province of Mersin, on the Mediterranean Sea, the Akkuyu nuclear plant has been controversial since it was first proposed in the 1970s. The meltdown at the Japanese Fukushima nuclear plant last year didn’t stall Turkey’s plans to build its own nuclear reactors. Like many Middle Eastern countries, as Green Prophet reported, […]

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Novel-tee Charges Your Phone, Someday

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Charging our clothes to credit cards is nothing new.  Now our clothes may be doing the charging. Scientists at the University of South Carolina (USC) have devised a way to turn the material in a cotton T-shirt into a source of electrical power. They envision a future where electronics are part of our wardrobe. A […]

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Biofuel from Plastic for this Young Egyptian Scientist from Alexandria

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Azza Abdel Hamid Faiad was the winner of the 2011 European Union Contest for Young Scientists for finding a new way of turning plastic into biofuel. A sixteen-year-old Egyptian student, Azza Abdel Hamid Faiad from the Zahran Language School in Alexandria has identified a new low-cost catalyst which can generate biofuel by breaking down plastic waste. The idea of breaking down […]

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Leap-second Bug Consumes Megawatts of Electricity

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Was it the leap-second bug that pushed America’s power plants beyond their capacity? A 61 second minute was added to clocks around the world on June 30, 2012 at 23:59:60 UTC in order to compensate for slight variations in earth’s rotation speed.  This triggered a number of software bugs one of which caused a spike […]

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Google Resorts to Going Green With Trash Talk

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Gmail offers recycling tips. Apparently, they’ve been doing this for years. What rock have I been under? I was doing some email spring cleaning during an especially snooze-inducing conference call, and there in my Gmail Trash file, up popped a random recycling tip.  Newspapers can be reused as wrapping paper for gifts. I’ve been painting the New York […]

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Jordan Gets REEL About Renewables

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Jordan’s nuclear industry is wildly volatile, especially when you consider it doesn’t actually exist. Arwa reported on last week’s parliamentary vote to shelve Jordan’s first nuclear reactor. Exploratory mining for uranium was also stopped. The program will surely resurrect once new feasibility analyses are complete, but against a backdrop of a pressurized economy, scarce water […]

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Jordan Suspends Its Nuclear Plans Amid Controversy

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Jordan has supported a parliamentary committee recommendation to suspend Jordan’s projected nuclear programme It’s certainly been a busy week for Khaled Toukan who is commissioner of the Jordan Atomic Energy Commission. First, a parliamentary committee releases a report which states that he misled the public about the feasibility of uranium mining in Jordan and that […]

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Turkey’s Early Hydroelectric Dams Featured in Exhibit

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The first hydroelectric dam built in Ankara, Turkey’s capital city, the Çubuk Dam was promoted as “Ankara’s Bosphorus”. A new exhibit at Istanbul’s avant-garde SALT Galata gallery, Graft, throws open the archive of material about Turkey’s first major hydroelectric projects in the 1930s. The display critically analyzes the motives behind these early endeavors — and the […]

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Could America’s 250 Percent Tariff on Chinese PVs Help the Mideast?

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The United States Department of Commerce ruled yesterday that Chinese photovoltaic panel prices were below production costs and therefore their sale constituted dumping.   Proposed antidumping tariffs ranged from 31 percent to 250% and would come into force sometime after October 2012.  The tariff is expected to significantly increase the cost of solar installations in the […]

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