Lebanon Rocks Out To Cure The Green Blues

environmental activism, environmental art, environmental hazards, Mediterranean SeaBatroun is an outpost of beauty in Lebanon. The next generation of environmental activists want to make sure it stays that way.

Georges “Junior” Daou belongs to the next generation of Lebanese. A long time nature-lover, he has devoted himself full time to rejecting toxic waste in Beirut, consistent oil spills that degrade the Mediterranean Sea, and the maltreatment of animals. But the recent university graduate and his posse are approaching their environmental activism from a unique angle. In order to reach deep inside and awaken the green souls of their fellow Lebanese, they turn to art and music.

Singing the green blues

With support from the Ministry of Environment, Daou is the driving force behind the upcoming one day art, culture, and music festival at Wicker Park. In addition to viewing art, photography, and video footage that depict a selection of environmental hazards throughout Lebanon, attendees can rock out to cure their green blues.

Several bands, including Meen, Green Peter, Flying Circus, Jammit the band, and a renowned Lebanese rapper Pierre Hashash, will get together on 11 June, 2011 to bellow an assortment of blues, reggae, and rock tunes.

No more concrete jungle

Located in a sentimentally-important location of northern Lebanon, Batroun is a small fishing village that fostered the imaginations of many young children. Although it remains a beautiful refuge, Daou worries that in time, without action, this place too could become a “concrete jungle.”

Proceeds from the Wicker Park festival will go to Lebanon Green Again (LGA), a non-profit organization that strives to reduce the use of fossil fuels, increase the number of green spaces throughout the country, and regulate the fishing and hunting industries.

Tickets for the event cost $20 and can be purchased from Antoine Librarie bookshops.

:: Daily Star

More environmental activism and news from Lebanon:

Lebanese Man Turns Garbage into Beautiful Glasses

Lebanon’s Wasted Opportunity in Landfill Managment

Lebanon’s Sidon Garbage Dump More Serious than Thought

image via Petteri Sulonen


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