Sign to Save Lebanon’s Turtles! Ancient Naqura Coast on Mediterranean Sea At Risk

Turtles at the Lebanese CoastCampaigners in Lebanon are asking for support to protect an ancient Phoenician coastline which is under threat due to a port project

Lebanese environment campaigners are calling on nature lovers far and wide to help them protect an important piece of their natural heritage along the Mediterranean Sea. It seems that a beautiful part of the Southern coastline, the Naqura cliffs and beach, which is home to turtles is the site of a possible petroleum port development project. In an online petition they are calling on the government to declare the coastal area in south of Lebanon that stretches from the Naqura Cliffs to the Tyre Reserve a nationally protected area.

Naqura Cliffs, Mediterranean sea, lebanon

“Endangered species of turtles have been coming from all around the Mediterranean for thousands of years to lay their eggs and reproduce on these beaches [Mansouri beach and Kolaila beach],” explains campaigners.

According to the campaign material, the Lebanese coast is not more than a mere 210km long. Many parts of the coast are polluted and/or affected by illegal constructions. Less than 5 % of the coast remains clean and untouched. As such protecting this section currently under threat is of extreme importance as it is one of the last remaining natural spots on the historic ancient Phoenician coast.

The ancient Phoenician coast with its unique rock formation at the Naqura Cliffs is being endangered by a port project. A project campaigners are calling absurd and destructive.

You can help support the campaign by following developments here and also signing this petition. So far, over 7000 people have signed the petition bringing them pretty close to their 10,000 target.

For more on environmental issues in Lebanon see: 

Lebanon Joins CITES: Can We Stop Killing Everything Now?

Vertical Gardens Green Lebanese Restaurant

World’s Oldest Living Olive Trees in Lebanon

Live Art and Polemical Politics on the Lebanese Coast

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