Dubai’s police cars bikes and cars are ecological opposites

Dubai police eco-motorbike A year after unveiling new Lamborghini patrol vehicles for lucky members of the force, Dubai police are rolling out an eco-friendly electric motorcycle.  As far as we can tell – the 15,000-strong police force has purchased just one bike, which they tested at Jumeirah Beach Residence last week.

Colonel Abdul Qader Mohammed Al Banai, Director of Jebel Ali Police Station, conducted the trial and told Gulf Today that the motorbike would be used in patrolling narrow streets and congested districts.  The bike will also support security surveillance in traditional markets, shopping malls, historic sites and tourist attractions.

He added that Dubai police were working hard to create a safe, sustainable environment that meets the UAE’s “prominent international standing in regard to conservation of the environment.”  So how did their Lamborghini Aventadors factor into that equation?

A staggering 15% of traffic fines issued in Dubai are for driving at speeds exceeding 130 mph, which was part of the logic in buying fancy Italian racecars for their troopers. Energy efficient motorcycles won’t stand a chance in catching speedsters, and they’ll be miserable to operate in scorching UAE summers – but they are the eco-opposite of the force’s last vehicle choice.

Adorable Vespa motorbikes get about 100 miles per gallon of fuel, while a Lamborghini Aventador averages about 13 mpg.  Vehicle emissions are comparably skewed. Assuming that more than one eco-bike will be on patrol, this is a tiny step in the right direction.

Radical extremes co-exist in the UAE with apparent success – but in the case of cop cars, perhaps a move to the middle was in order. How many compact electric cars or cheap hybrid cars can you buy for a mildly used Lamborghini?

Image of logo from Dubai Police

2 thoughts on “Dubai’s police cars bikes and cars are ecological opposites

  1. richard

    The supercar police cars are PR stunts primarily; Dubai loves to be on the world wide headlines. Trouble is they also want to tell us how hard they are working to be sustainable; infact, the PR effort telling everyone how hard they are working towards that goal far eclipses the actual efforts being made towards it.

    Reply

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