Tea Extract from Pakistan May Help Treat Breast Cancer

cleavage tea pakistan A tea made from a plant found in Pakistan, India, Africa and parts of Europe may help treat breast cancer, study suggests.

Following our report on turmeric‘s benefits for natural breast health, science is finding more evidence for Mother Nature’s healing possibilities. According to ScienceDaily.com, “scientists at Aston University and Russells Hall Hospital have discovered that an extract from a common plant in Pakistan may help treat breast cancer.”

While more research is needed, according to the report, the results were free from the side effects such as hair loss associate with modern cancer treatments. The plant, called Fagonia cretica, is part of a family of plants that grow in arid, desert regions including Africa, the Mediterranean and Middle East regions.

From the ScienceDaily.com report:

“The plant, Fagonia cretica, and known as Virgon’s Mantlem, is commonly used in herbal tea. It has been traditionally used to treat women in rural Pakistan who have breast cancer, but up until now this treatment has been regarded as something of a folklore remedy. However, patients in Pakistan who have taken the plant extract have reported that it does not appear to generate any of the serious common side effects associated with other cancer treatments, such as loss of hair, drop in blood count or diarrhea.”

Now, scientists at Aston University in Birmingham and Russells Hall Hospital in Dudley have undertaken tests of the plant extract and demonstrated that it kills cancer cells without damage to normal breast cells in laboratory conditions.

Professor Helen Griffith and Professor Amutul R Carmichael who lead the study are now aiming to identify which element or elements of the plant are responsible for killing the cancer cells with a view to eventually begin trails with human cancer patients.

Professor Helen Griffith of Aston University said; “More research is needed to establish the role of the extract in cancer management and It now needs to be demonstrated that this extract is as effective in killing cancer cells inside the body as it is within laboratory. The next steps are to identify which element of the plant is responsible for killing the cancer cells with a view to eventually begin trails with human cancer patients.”

 

As an plant family, Fogonia is distributed across many regions. The rural communities in Pakistan and beyond who are familiar with it as a potential medicine or supplement ‘may not benefit from it’s development as a pharmaceutical,’ writes a Nature and Science blog devoted to natural medicinal discoveries. “The populations who know and use the herb, perhaps originally because they have few other affordable or effective options, are not likely to see much recognition of their prior art in having knowledge of the herb as a medicine.” 

Overall, this is good news for women who are interested in learning more about herbs for breast health, enhancing breasts naturally or who understand the delicate balance between living sustainably and sexual wellness. With environmental toxins being likely culprits for a variety of concerns including increasing breast size, it’s important that further research is completed that does more than simply identify the cancer-fighting compounds within this plant. Really smart science would ask those who are familiar with Fagonia‘s properties to share how best to serve these specific cups of tea while honoring humanity’s long history of turning to nature for what ails us, breasts and all.

:: Image via Diana Blackwell

Read more breast health news:

Are Hormones in the Environment Making Breasts Bigger?
How do Tree Humpers Prevent Pregnancy?

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