How to Make Etrog Jam

etrog jam how to sukkoth, esrog, succoth, succot

After the Hebrew holiday Succoth, families everywhere will have an extra etrog which can make a delicious jam. Just make sure the etrog is organic. Here’s Green Prophet’s recipe to make your own:

Ingredients for etrog (esrog) jam

  • 1 etrog (citron)
  • 6 cups water
  • 3/4 cup sugar

Slice and remove as many seeds as possible. Try slicing the long way into eighths to get seeds out as efficiently as possible. There are a LOT of seeds in an etrog so allow at least 1 hr for this step.

Chop the etrog fruit into very small pieces, including the peel, consider for this step using the food processor.

Cover fruit with water and refrigerate for at least 12 hours. Next, bring everything to a boil, and simmer uncovered for 20 minutes. Drain fruit.

Cover fruit with water and simmer again for 20 minutes, then refrigerate everything for at least 12 hours. Drain. Cover fruit with water and simmer uncovered again for 20 minutes. Drain fruit.

(These steps are important since if you skip them the finished product will be bitter!)

Cover fruit with water and add most of the sugar. Bring to a boil and simmer uncovered for 1 hour. Be careful here, if you leave it for a minute it can burn on the bottom. If it does burn, do not stir up the burned parts into the jam. Dump the stuff into a clean bowl, wash out your pot, put the jelly back in and continue.

Taste to see if you need to add more sugar. Continue simmering for ½ hour or more. The temperature should be 220º–222º, the water should be syrupy and the fruit should be clear-ish.

It should cool and congeal, if it is still runny some people add ¼ – ½ cup of orange marmalade per quart to add “pectin” and cook 15-20 minutes more. Personally, I think that however it comes out is nice.

Want more jams and preserves? See Green Prophet’s irresistible recipes for jam and cucumbers:

Indulgence, Locavore Style: Homemade Strawberry Jam
Pickling 101 – Vinegared Cucumber Salad Recipe

(This post was updated from 2008)

11 thoughts on “How to Make Etrog Jam

  1. Pingback: Jerusalem Dig Reveals First Etrog Tree in the Holy Land | Green Prophet

  2. ben

    dont worry about pesticides, since you used the esrog for a Mitzvah all the bad stuff went out of it, and you wont come to harm.

    And especially after boiling it and changing the water a few times, helps to clean all germs and poison.

    Reply
  3. Pingback: Don’t Eat Your Etrog Unless You Know It’s Organic | Green Prophet

  4. Arlene Jacoby

    The recipe calls for 6 cups of water and says to cover the fruit with water, refrigerate and drain 4 different times. Should the water JUST cover the fruit or should 6 cups be used each time and when it says cover with water and simmer how much water should be used?

    Arlene Jacoby

    Reply
  5. Eric

    It’s true – the etrog is one of the most toxic, highly-sprayed fruits on the market, because it is usually purchased for ritual purposes, and not to be eaten. Don’t make any etrog recipes unless you know that the source of your etrog uses sustainable farming (and if you can find such a source, please let the rest of us know!).

    See here for more info:

    http://jcarrot.org/the-toxic-etrog-read-before-you-eat

    Reply
  6. Daniel

    Anyone know how to make carob jam? I hear its delicious. The trees grow all over the emek haella region and you can eat the carob fruit right off the trees, a lot easier on the teeth than sugar. I can’t seem to find a recipe anywhere…

    Reply
  7. Jack Reichert

    I don’t know about the pesticide levels but I love the vodka tip! Some people use their lulav as fuel for burning the hometz in order to connect one holiday to the next. this seems like a more eco-friendly way to tie things up =)

    Reply
  8. Daniel Pedersen

    My friend Hillel Bromberg makes Etrog Vodka from his leftovers – he dices up the peels and adds them with sugar to a bottle of Absolut Vodka. At Purim he pulls out the bottle at megilla reading, and a good time is had by all.

    Reply
  9. Daniel Pedersen

    I have heard that Etrogim may have high levels of pesticides in them. Since they are grown not to be eaten, but for the mitzvah of 4 minim, perfect looks will get the highest price. Therefore, they are much more likely to be grown with large amounts of pesticides in order to prevent any insect damage that will mar their perfection.
    I don’t know this for a fact, since I haven’t found any studies that have tested pesticide levels in Etrogim.
    Does anyone know how etrogim are grown and what the pesticide regime is for them? Does anyone know whether this should be a concern?

    Reply

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